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Historic Sites on the Shore
There are several Historical sites on the MD Eastern Shore that are recognized as significant to Maryland Eastern Shore Black history. Many have been recognized by The State or the Lower Eastern Shore Heritage Council (LESHC). Here are a few.

Harriett Tubman Historical Marker
A State Historic marker commemorates the birth place of Harriet Ross Tubman at the former Brodess plantation located off Bucktown Rd. near Cambridge, in Dorchester County Maryland.


UMES
PHOTO The former Princess Anne Academy was run by an African American nun. It is now the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, located in Princess Anne. It has a colorful sign marking it as one of the African American historical attractions in the Lower Shore Tri-County area by the Lower Eastern Shore Heritage Council (LESHC).


Unionville
Located in Talbot County Maryland off ofSt. Michael's Rd., Unionville was one of the only free African American villages in the country prior to the Civil War. Originally called "Cawgillton" after the prominent Talbot County Cawgill family who owned the land. After the War, the property was American Union soldiers who fought in the war. The town was renamed in their honor. A memorial to them can be found at the church in the town.


Chipman Center
The Charles H. Chipman cultural Center is located at N. R10 13 & Broad S10in Salisbury. It is open to the public and available for functions. It has a colorful sign marking it as one of the African American historical attractions in the Lower Shore Tri-County area by the Lower Eastern Shore Heritage Council (LESHC).


Frederick Douglass Historical Marker
A marker commemorating Frederick Douglass is located at the site where he was born at Trappers Corner, near Matthews, on R10328 near Easton, in Talbot County.


Germantown School
The former Colored school, located in the Germantown section of Berlin, MD, is being preserved as a museum, and community center. It has a colorful sign marking it as one of the Lower Shore African American historical attractions by the LESHC.


Henry's Beach
A State Historic Marker is near the site where Henry's Beach was from 1952 to 1982. It is located in Somerset County's Dames Quarter. The popular day resort for Blacks and the general public was operated by Black business owners George and Lorraine Henry. The only Black beach resort in the state in 1952, families enjoyed swimmmg, fishing, crabbing, home-style food, ball games, and top Black entertainers of the period. The LESHC marker at UMES is one of six such signs posted in 2005.


Sturgis School
The Sturgis One Room School Museum is located in downtown Pocomoke City, MD. The restored and relocated former one-room Black school was expanded last year with the addition of the Heritage House that houses offices and a reception area. It is open to visitors. It has a colorful sign marking it as one of the Lower Shore African American historical attractions by the LESHC.


Charles Tindley's Birthplace
The "Prince of Preachers," Charles Albert Tindley was born about 1855 in Berlin, Worcester County. He founded one of the largest Methodist congregations serving the African American community on the East Coast and is recognized as one of the founding fathers of American gospel music. He wrote the Civil Rights Movement anthem "We Shall Overcome" and the song "Stand by Me," which Ben E. King later made famous. The Germantown School will house an exhibit of his artifacts. His birth has a colorful LESHC sign marking it as one of the Lower Shore African American historical attractions.


St. James Church
Built in 1885 by children of former slaves, St. James Leadership Conference founded Church is located in Oriole, Somerset County near Deal Island, MD. It is marked as one of Lower Shore African historical attractions by the colorful LESHC sign.

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